National Park Bavarian Forest - Germany

Basic Information
Site Name
National Park Bavarian Forest
Short name
DE-10-BW
Country
Germany
Site Manager
Site Description
The Bavarian Forest National Park is situated in the Bavarian part of the Bohemian Forest which is one of the largest forest landscapes in Central Europe. Its administration follows a strict non-intervention nature conservation management which allows untouched natural disturbance and regeneration of ecosystems on more 67 % of the area. And it allows the monitoring of changes in environmental conditions driven by direct and indirect anthropogenic impacts in the global change and their effects on biodiversity in terrestrial and aquatic habitats. The park covers 245 km2 with an elevation range of 850 m between 600 and 1453 m a.s.l. (Großer Rachel). The bedrock consists of magmatic (mostly granite) and metamorphic rocks (paragneiss, migmatite, orthogneiss). Predominant soils are Cambisols, Rankers and Podzols on hillslopes as well as Histosols and Gleysols across the whole relief. Mean annual temperature and precipitation is 7–4°C and 1100–2000mm depending on altitude.
Last modified
2020-06-29 10:06:38
General Characteristics, Purpose, History
Site Status
Operational
Year Established
1970
Purpose
Several monitoring programmes have been carried out in the Große Ohe headwater catchment to detect hydrological and hydrogeochemical changes due to land use and vegetation changes (since 1977) and due to the input of air pollutants deposition (since 1987). In 2015, extended monitoring activities of climate change effects on macroinvertebrates in surface waters and on bog hydrology have been launched. Changes in vegetation composition and cover are detected by using remote sensing methods (airborne and satellite imagery, laser scanning). Additionally, biodiversity monitoring of different terrestrial taxa has been carried out on sample plots. Since 2011 the National Park set up several dead wood experiments. Overall aim of these experiments is to disentangle important drivers of the saproxylic diversity and to gather a deeper mechanistic understanding of species assembly processes. An additional topic is the link between diversity pattern and important processes like wood decay. In our experiments we consider all important groups of organisms involved in decomposition (e.g., fungi, bacteria and insects) and intend to cover the entire range of decomposition via monitoring (ca. 30 years). We use classical trap systems to monitor insects (e.g. flight interception traps, eclectors). Fungi are inventoried by fruit body sampling and molecular techniques. For bacteria we use molecular techniques only.
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Affiliation and Network Specific Information
Affiliation
ILTERThis site is a verified "ILTER" member.
LTER EuropeThis site is a verified "LTER Europe" member.
LTER-D (Germany) (LTER_EU_DE_010)This site is a verified "LTER-D (Germany)" member.
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